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"Make Every Day Water Day"



Open Sustainability, Creativity & Innovation


Millions of people around the world don't have safe water. 
World Water Day is March 22nd — a day when the world turns its attention towards the 750 million people who lack access to safe water. But every day of the year can be a Water Day. When Rajamma opens her tap, or Grace hears raindrops filling her catchment system, or when Poppy is able to offer her children a safe drink of water — each of these is a Water Day. 

 





The water crisis is the #1 global risk based on impact to society (as a measure of devastation), and the #8 global risk based on likelihood (likelihood of occurring within 10 years) as announced by the World Economic Forum, January 2015.4

750 million people around the world lack access to safe water; approximately one in nine people.2

More than twice the population of the United States lives without access to safe water.2,3

Diarrhea caused by inadequate drinking water, sanitation, and hand hygiene kills an estimated 842,000 people every year globally, or approximately 2,300 people per day.1

82% of those who lack access to improved water live in rural areas, while just 18% live in urban areas.2








Diarrhea is more prevalent throughout the developing world largely due to the lower levels of access to safe drinking water and sanitation, along with poorer overall health, hygiene, and nutritional status.1

An estimated 502,000 people die every year from preventable cases of diarrhea caused by inadequate drinking water.2

An estimated 280,000 people die every year from preventable cases of diarrhea caused by inadequate sanitation.2

An estimated 297,000 people die every year from preventable cases of diarrhea caused by inadequate hand hygiene.2

It is estimated that nearly 10% of the global disease burden could be reduced through improved water supply, sanitation, hygiene, and water resource management.3

58% of cases of diarrhea in middle and low-income countries are estimated to be attributable to inadequate drinking water, inadequate sanitation, and poor hand hygiene.2


 

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SOURCE: disease and water via water.org (CC BY SA)

Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 United States License.

 

Resource Links

Look for more facts in  Water Resource Links.


References

  1. Estimated with data from UNICEF, WHO 2009 Diarhhoea: Why children are still dying and what can be done.
  2. Tropical Medicine and International Health. 19, no. 8 (2014): 894 - 905. Burden of disease from inadequate water, sanitation and hygiene in low- and middle-income settings: a retrospective analysis of data from 145 countries.
  3. UN Water. (2009). The United Nations World Water Development Report 3, Water in a Changing World.
  4. Tropical Medicine and International Health. 19, no. 8 (2014): 894 - 905. Burden of disease from inadequate water, sanitation and hygiene in low- and middle-income settings: a retrospective analysis of data from 145 countries.
  5. World Health Organization and UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP). (2014). Progress on Drinking Water and Sanitation, 2014 Update.
  6. United States Census Bureau Estimates. (2014). U.S. Census Bureau, International Data Base.
  7. World Economic Forum (2015).Global Risks 2015 Report.
  8. Map data sourced from WHO/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme for Water Supply and Sanitation. (2014). Pg. 14. Based on 2012 Data. Progress on Drinking Water and Sanitation, 2014 Update.

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