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"2017 WOMENS MARCH" Redefing the Protest in new Age





OPEN MIND  & DISRUPT
 "2017 WOMEN'S MARCH"
REDEFINING THE PROTEST IN NEW AGE



HISTORIC MARCH FOR HUMAN RIGHT & ANTI-TRUMP "It is not our differences that divide us. It is our inability to recognize, accept, and celebrate those differences. " — Audre Lorde


Women’s rights are human rights, regardless of a woman’s race, ethnicity, religion, immigration status, sexual identity, gender expression, economic status, age or disability. On January 21, over 5 Million of us worldwide and over 1 Million in Washington, D.C., came to march, speak and make our voices heard. But it doesn’t end here - now is not the time to hang up our marching shoes - it’s time to get our friends, family and community together and make history. Marches occurred worldwide, with 168 in 81 other countries. Officials behind the organization reported 673 marches worldwide, with 20 in Mexico and 29 in Canada. READ MORE ABOUT THIS AMAZING SOCIAL EVENT, THAT DISRUPTED THE WORLD . .


 http://ecoworldreactor.blogspot.com/2015/08/classic-art-pop-culture-nastya-nudnik.html













The Women's March was a protest on January 21, 2017, in support of women's rights and other causes including immigration reform, health care reform, protection of the natural environment, LGBTQ rights, racial justice, freedom of religion, and workers' rights. The rallies were aimed at Donald Trump, the recently inaugurated President of the United States, and especially at his statements and positions some regarded as anti-women or in other ways reprehensible.


The first protest was planned in Washington, D.C., and was known as the Women's March on Washington.  It was organized as a grassroots movement and took place on the day after Trump's inauguration on January 20. It aimed to "send a bold message to our new administration on their first day in office, and to the world that women's rights are human rights".  More than three times as many people attended the protest in Washington, D.C., as attended the Trump inauguration itself.  The Washington March was also streamed live on YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter. 



 The organizers also addressed environmental issues: 

"We believe that every person and every community in our nation has the right to clean water, clean air, and access to and enjoyment of public lands. We believe that our environment and our climate must be protected, and that our land and natural resources cannot be exploited for corporate gain or greed—especially at the risk of public safety and health."







 


The march drew at least half a million in Washington, and some estimates put worldwide participation at 4.8 million,  according to WomensMarch.com on January 23, 2017.  At least 408 marches were planned in the U.S. and 168 in 81  other countries. 



After the march, officials behind the organization reported 673 marches took place worldwide, including 29 in Canada and 20 in Mexico.  In the United States, the protests were the largest political demonstrations since the anti–Vietnam War protests in the 1960s and 1970s.  The Women's March crowds were generally peaceful. For example, in Washington, D.C., Chicago, Los Angeles (where, according to organizers, 750,000 people marched),  New York, and Seattle, where an estimated combined total of 2 million people marched, no arrests were made.












 
Organizers

The march's organizers began planning it on November 9, 2016, the day after the United States Election Day, in reaction to Trump's election and political views.



Teresa Shook of Hawaii created a Facebook event and invited friends to march on Washington to protest Trump's election win. Similar Facebook pages created by Evvie Harmon, Fontaine Pearson, Bob Bland (a New York fashion designer), Breanne Butler, and others quickly led to thousands of women signing up to march. Harmon, Pearson, and Butler decided to unite their efforts and consolidate their pages, beginning the official Women's March on Washington. To ensure that the march was led by women of differing races and backgrounds, Vanessa Wruble, co-founder and Head of Campaign Operations, brought on Tamika D. Mallory, Carmen Perez and Linda Sarsour to serve as National Co-Chairs alongside Bland.



Organizers stated the march focused on more than just opposing Trump and "more about being proactive about women's rights", or broadly, "a stand on social justice and human rights issues ranging from race, ethnicity, gender, religion, immigration and healthcare". Still, opposition to and defiance of Trump infused much of the protests, with some directly calling them anti-Trump protests.



 






The march drew at least half a million in Washington D.C. and was three times the size of the audience at President Trump's inauguration. Nearly 5 million participated worldwide.







 

Shepard Fairey   is an American contemporary street artist, graphic designer, activist, illustrator and founder of OBEY Clothing. He made illustrations for women's rights on WOMENS MARCH 2017 and  that came out in the major newspapers of the United States and were used in the marches of women held today in different parts of the world.

 




A 2016 poster by Fairey, shown during the 2017 Women's March, depicts a Muslim-American woman










COMMENTARY
 

Honorary co-chair Gloria Steinem commented: "Our constitution does not begin with 'I, the President.' It begins with, 'We, the People.' I am proud to be one of thousands who have come to Washington to make clear that we will keep working for a democracy in which we are linked as human beings, not ranked by race or gender or class or any other label."







The youngest presenter at the Washington D.C. march, 6-year-old Sophie Cruz, said, "Let us fight with love, faith and courage so that our families will not be destroyed," and she ended her speech saying, "I also want to tell the children not to be afraid, because we are not alone. There are still many people that have their hearts filled with love. Let's keep together and fight for the rights. God is with us." Cruz repeated her speech in Spanish.







Scarlett Johansson called for long-term change, "Once the heaviness [of the election] began to subside, an opportunity has presented itself to make real long-term change, not just for future Americans, but in the way we view our responsibility to get involved with and stay active in our communities. Let this weight not drag you down, but help to get your heels stuck in."





America Ferrera stated, "If we – the millions of Americans who believe in common decency, in the greater good, in justice for all – if we fall into the trap by separating ourselves by our causes and our labels, then we will weaken our fight and we will lose. But if we commit to what aligns us, if we stand together steadfast and determined, then we stand a chance of saving the soul of our country."








Calling for participation following the march to maintain the momentum, Michael Moore urged marchers to engage in "100 days of protest" to the Trump administration. He established a website named The First 100 Days of Resistance, which offers a plan to implement the marcher's goals. He asked that people join the coalition "to stop Trump's hate-filled agenda and continue to advance the cause of racial, social, environmental and economic justice". Saying the Democratic Party needs new leadership, Moore also urged marchers to run for office.


Alicia Keys performed at the rally saying, "We are mothers. We are caregivers. We are artists. We are activists. We are entrepreneurs, doctors, leaders of industry and technology. Our potential is unlimited. We rise." - Angela Davis spoke saying, "We recognize that we are collective agents of history and that history cannot be deleted like web pages." Maryum Ali also spoke saying, "Don't get frustrated, get involved. Don't complain, organize."





 Pussyhat Project

The Pussyhat Project was a nationwide effort initiated by Krista Suh and Jayna Zweiman of Los Angeles to knit, crochet or sew pink hats to be worn at the march.


Their name refers to the resemblance of the hats' corners to cat ears and attempts to reclaim the derogatory term "pussy", a play on Trump's widely reported 2005 remarks that women would let him "grab them by the pussy". Many of the hats worn by marchers in Washington, D.C., were created by crafters who were unable to attend personally and wished them to be worn by those who could, thereby attending by proxy. The hats optionally contained notes from the crafters to the wearers, expressing support. They were distributed by the crafters themselves, by yarn stores at the points of origin, carried to the event by marchers, and also distributed at the destination. The hats' production caused a shortage of pink wool knitting yarn. On the day of the march, NPR compared the hats to the "Make America Great Again" hats worn by Trump supporters.












Marches occurred worldwide, with 168 in 81 other countries. Officials behind the organization reported 673 marches worldwide, with 20 in Mexico and 29 in Canada.

 




 "THE WOMENS MARCH"

READ MORE ABOUT THE WOMENS MARCH OF THE OWN WORDS OF ITS ORGANIZERS:


Mission & Vision

We stand together in solidarity with our partners and children for the protection of our rights, our safety, our health, and our families - recognizing that our vibrant and diverse communities are the strength of our country.


Women's March Global

Women’s March Global invites individuals and organizations committed to equality, diversity, and inclusion and those who understand women’s rights as human rights to join our local coalitions of marchers in representing the rights and voices of progressive people around the world.


As concerned citizens standing up for human rights, Women’s March Global immediately seeks to increase the number of coalitions participating in the upcoming global marches, while continuing to organize future campaigns. Women’s March Global is building and empowering a persistent global network that will organize future campaigns and actions in support of progressive values including women’s rights.


Women’s March Global is a proactive international movement, not a U.S. election-specific protest per se, which has galvanized people to defend women's rights and those of others in response to the rising rhetoric of far-right populism around the world.




more information on:
womensmarch.com




OUR MISSION

The rhetoric of the past election cycle has insulted, demonized, and threatened many of us - immigrants of all statuses, Muslims and those of diverse religious faiths, people who identify as LGBTQIA, Native people, Black and Brown people, people with disabilities, survivors of sexual assault - and our communities are hurting and scared. We are confronted with the question of how to move forward in the face of national and international concern and fear.


In the spirit of democracy and honoring the champions of human rights, dignity, and justice who have come before us, we join in diversity to show our presence in numbers too great to ignore. The Women’s March on Washington will send a bold message to our new government on their first day in office, and to the world that women's rights are human rights. We stand together, recognizing that defending the most marginalized among us is defending all of us.


We support the advocacy and resistance movements that reflect our multiple and intersecting identities. We call on all defenders of human rights to join us. This march is the first step towards unifying our communities, grounded in new relationships, to create change from the grassroots level up. We will not rest until women have parity and equity at all levels of leadership in society. We work peacefully while recognizing there is no true peace without justice and equity for all.



HEAR OUR VOICE.











“It is not our differences that divide us. It is our inability to recognize, accept, and celebrate those differences.









— Audre Lorde
 
 
 













 
 
GUIDING PRINCIPLES


Women’s rights are human rights, regardless of a woman’s race, ethnicity, religion, immigration status, sexual identity, gender expression, economic status, age or disability. We practice empathy with the intent to learn about the intersecting identities of each other. We will suspend our first judgement and do our best to lead without ego. We follow the principles of Kingian nonviolence, which are defined as follows:

  • Principle 1: Nonviolence is a way of life for courageous people. It is a positive force confronting the forces of injustice and utilizes the righteous indignation and spiritual, emotional, and intellectual capabilities of people as the vital force for change and reconciliation.

  • Principle 2: The Beloved Community is the framework for the future. The nonviolent concept is an overall effort to achieve a reconciled world by raising the level of relationships among people to a height where justice prevails and persons attain their full human potential.


  • Principle 3: Attack forces of evil, not persons doing evil. The nonviolent approach helps one analyze the fundamental conditions, policies and practices of the conflict rather than reacting to one’s opponents or their personalities.

  • Principle 4: Accept suffering without retaliation for the sake of the cause to achieve our goal. Self-chosen suffering is redemptive and helps the movement grow in a spiritual as well as a humanitarian dimension. The moral authority of voluntary suffering for a goal communicates the concern to one’s own friends and community as well as to the opponent.

  • Principle 5: Avoid internal violence of the spirit as well as external physical violence. The nonviolent attitude permeates all aspects of the campaign. It provides a mirror type reflection of the reality of the condition to one’s opponent and the community at large. Specific activities must be designed to maintain a high level of spirit and morale during a nonviolent campaign.






Unity Principles

Click to download full PDF

We believe that Women’s Rights are Human Rights and Human Rights are Women’s Rights. We must create a society in which women - including Black women, Native women, poor women, immigrant women, disabled women, Muslim women, lesbian queer and trans women - are free and able to care for and nurture their families, however they are formed, in safe and healthy environments free from structural impediments. 


ENDING VIOLENCE
Women deserve to live full and healthy lives, free of all forms of violence against our bodies. We believe in accountability and justice in cases of police brutality and ending racial profiling and targeting of communities of color. It is our moral imperative to dismantle the gender and racial inequities within the criminal justice system.


REPRODUCTIVE RIGHTS
We believe in Reproductive Freedom. We do not accept any federal, state or local rollbacks, cuts or restrictions on our ability to access quality reproductive healthcare services, birth control, HIV/AIDS care and prevention, or medically accurate sexuality education. This means open access to safe, legal, affordable abortion and birth control for all people, regardless of income, location or education. 


LGBTQIA RIGHTS
We firmly declare that LGBTQIA Rights are Human Rights and that it is our obligation to uplift, expand and protect the rights of our gay, lesbian, bi, queer, trans or gender non-conforming brothers, sisters and siblings. We must have the power to control our bodies and be free from gender norms, expectations and stereotypes.


WORKER’S RIGHTS
We believe in an economy powered by transparency, accountability, security and equity. All women should be paid equitably, with access to affordable childcare, sick days, healthcare, paid family leave, and healthy work environments. All workers – including domestic and farm workers, undocumented and migrant workers - must have the right to organize and fight for a living minimum wage.


CIVIL RIGHTS
We believe Civil Rights are our birthright, including voting rights, freedom to worship without fear of intimidation or harassment, freedom of speech, and protections for all citizens regardless of race, gender, age or disability. We believe it is time for an all-inclusive Equal Rights Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.  


  DISABILITY RIGHTS
We believe that all women’s issues are issues faced by women with disabilities and Deaf women. As mothers, sisters, daughters, and contributing members of this great nation, we seek to break barriers to access, inclusion, independence, and the full enjoyment of citizenship at home and around the world. We strive to be fully included in and contribute to all aspects of American life, economy, and culture.


IMMIGRANT RIGHTS
Rooted in the promise of America’s call for huddled masses yearning to breathe free, we believe in immigrant and refugee rights regardless of status or country of origin.  We believe migration is a human right and that no human being is illegal.


ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE
We believe that every person and every community in our nation has the right to clean water, clean air, and access to and enjoyment of public lands. We believe that our environment and our climate must be protected, and that our land and natural resources cannot be exploited for corporate gain or greed - especially at the risk of public safety and health.








SOURCE:  2017 Women's March by Wikipedia (CC BY SA)
 
WOMENS MARCH by womensmarch.com






 













 
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