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"NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD" 1968




THE CLASSIC HORROR MOVIE BY GEORGE A. ROMERO

Romero revolutionized the horror film genre with Night of the Living Dead; according to Almar Haflidason of the BBC, the film represented "a new dawn in horror film-making". The film has also effectively redefined the use of the term "zombie". While the word "zombie" itself is never used—the word used in the film is ghoul—Romero's film introduced the theme of zombies as reanimated, flesh-eating cannibals.

 Night of the Living Dead is a 1968 American independent horror film directed by George A. Romero, co-written by Romero and John Russo, and starring Duane Jones and Judith O'Dea. The story follows characters Ben (Jones), Barbra (O'Dea), and five others trapped in a rural farmhouse in western Pennsylvania , which is besieged by a large and growing group of unnamed "living dead" monsters.  BELOW THIS DISRUPTED HORROR MOVIE THAT REDEFINED THE ZOMBIE WORLD...





















Night of the Living Dead is a 1968 American independent horror film directed by George A. Romero, co-written by Romero and John Russo, and starring Duane Jones and Judith O'Dea. The story follows characters Ben (Jones), Barbra (O'Dea), and five others trapped in a rural farmhouse in western Pennsylvania, which is besieged by a large and growing group of unnamed "living dead" monsters.


Directed by  George A. Romero
Produced by  Russell W. Streiner and Karl Hardman
Screenplay by     John Russo &   George Romero
Release date  October 1, 1968
Licensed   Public Domain
Running time 96 minutes

Due to the film's perceived public domain status, several independent film companies have also done remakes of the film.




LEGACY

Romero revolutionized the horror film genre with Night of the Living Dead; according to Almar Haflidason of the BBC, the film represented "a new dawn in horror film-making". The film has also effectively redefined the use of the term "zombie". While the word "zombie" itself is never used—the word used in the film is ghoul—Romero's film introduced the theme of zombies as reanimated, flesh-eating cannibals. Romero himself didn't initially consider the antagonists in the film zombies, later saying "I never thought of my guys as zombies, when I made the first film...To me, zombies were still those boys in the Caribbean doing the wetwork for [Bela] Lugosi." 


The film and its successors spawned countless imitators, in cinema, television and video gaming, which borrowed elements invented by Romero. Night of the Living Dead ushered in the splatter film subgenre. As one film historian points out, horror prior to Romero's film had mostly involved rubber masks and costumes, cardboard sets, or mysterious figures lurking in the shadows. They were set in locations far removed from rural and suburban America. Romero revealed the power behind exploitation and setting horror in ordinary, unexceptional locations and offered a template for making an "effective and lucrative" film on a "minuscule budget". Slasher films of the 1970s and 80s such as John Carpenter's Halloween (1978), Sean S. Cunningham's Friday the 13th (1980), and Wes Craven's A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984) "owe much to the original Night of the Living Dead", according to author Barry Keith Grant.


Night of the Living Dead entered the public domain in the United States because the original theatrical distributor, the Walter Reade Organization, neglected to place a copyright indication on the prints. In 1968, United States copyright law required a proper notice for a work to maintain a copyright. Image Ten displayed such a notice on the title frames of the film beneath the original title, Night of the Flesh Eaters. The distributor removed the statement when it changed the title.



SOURCE: "NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD"  by George A. Romero  (1968)(CC0)
"NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD by Wikipedia (CC BY SA)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Night_of_the_Living_Dead


more information:

Starring 
    Duane Jones
    Judith O'Dea
    Marilyn Eastman
    Karl Hardman
    Judith Ridley
    Keith Wayne

Music by      William Loose  Stock recording:    Fred Steiner
Cinematography  George A. Romero
Edited by  George A. Romero
Production
companies

    Image Ten
    Laurel Group
    Market Square Productions
Distributed by 
    The Walter Reade Organization
    Continental Distributing
Country  United States
Language  English
















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