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"Homage to Méliès" by the Smashing Pumpkins

Homage to Georges Méliès

"Createur du Spectacle Cinematographique"



The Smashing Pumpkins 'Tonight, tonight'

 

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"Tonight, Tonight" is a song by American alternative rock band The Smashing Pumpkins, written by the band's frontman, Billy Corgan. It was the fourth single and second track from their third album, Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness, and was released in April 1996. "Tonight, Tonight" . 


The concept of music video, inspired by Georges Méliès's silent film A Trip to the Moon, came from directors Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris, who got the idea for the video because the album cover for Mellon Collie reminded them of early silent films. Hence, the video was filmed in the style of a turn-of-the-century silent film using theater-style backdrops and primitive special effects. Most of the video's backdrops and puppetwork were created by artist Wayne White. In the end they are rescued by a ship called "S.S. Méliès", in reference to the movie director.


Georges Méliès (/mɛ.li.ˈəz/French: [meljɛs]; 8 December 1861 – 21 January 1938), full name Marie-Georges-Jean Méliès, was a Frenchillusionist and filmmaker famous for leading many technical and narrative developments in the earliest days of cinema

Méliès, a prolific innovator in the use of special effects, accidentally discovered the substitution stop trick in 1896, and was one of the first filmmakers to usemultiple exposurestime-lapse photographydissolves, and hand-painted color in his work. Because of his ability to seemingly manipulate and transform reality through cinematography, Méliès is sometimes referred to as the first "Cinemagician".

Two of his best-known films are A Trip to the Moon (1902) and The Impossible Voyage (1904). Both stories involve strange, surreal voyages, somewhat in the style of Jules Verne, and are considered among the most important early science fiction films, though their approach is closer to fantasy. Méliès was also an early pioneer of horror cinema, which can be traced back to his Le Manoir du diable (1896). He was also featured in the book The Invention of Hugo Cabret as well as its film adaptation Hugo, where he was portrayed by Ben Kingsley.

In popular culture

The work of Georges Méliès has been referenced a number of times in film, television and fiction, including:

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