CREATIVITY is CONTAGIOUS! PASSitON
ECOWR BLOG #ThinkOUTSIDEtheBOX

"Mark Zuckerberg on Congress"




  TECHNOLOGY & DISRUPTION
"Mark Zuckerberg on Congress"
THE FACEBOOK CEO TESTIFYING VIA BLOOMBERG TV

On April 10 and April 11, Mark Zuckerberg began testifying before the United States Congress regarding usage of personal data. The Facebook CEO testified on Capitol Hill to answer lawmakers' questions about the data debacle. The Facebook–Cambridge Analytica data scandal involves the collection of personally identifiable information of up to 87 million Facebook users that Cambridge Analytica began collecting in 2014. The data was used to influence voter opinion on behalf of politicians who hire them. The breach was significant for inciting public discussion on ethical standards for social media companies, political consulting organizations, and politicians. On the first day of the testification the Sen. John Kennedy had a blunt message for  Mark Zuckerberg: "Your user agreement sucks."  You can watch to Facebook's CEO, Mark Zuckerberg Testifies Before Congress the two days.


 "   "  














The move comes in the aftermath of the Cambridge Analytica scandal , in which data from tens of millions of Facebook users was improperly obtained and utilized by the consultancy in the run-up to the 2016 US presidential election.


Facebook's CEO Mark Zuckerberg Testifies Before Congress | Day 1






"I don't want anyone at our company to make any decisions based on the political ideology of the content," he said



Facebook's CEO Mark Zuckerberg Testifies Before Congress | Day 2







On April 10 and April 11, Mark Zuckerberg began testifying before the United States Congress regarding usage of personal data by Facebook




 The Facebook–Cambridge Analytica data scandal involves the collection of personally identifiable information of up to 87 million Facebook users that Cambridge Analytica began collecting in 2014. The data was used to influence voter opinion on behalf of politicians who hire them. Following the breach, Facebook apologized and experienced public outcry and lowered stock prices, calling the way that Cambridge Analytica collected the data "inappropriate."



 Sen. John Kennedy had a blunt message for Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg: "Your user agreement sucks."

 

He said that's what everybody has been trying to tell him today.

    "You can spot me 75 IQ points. If I can figure it out, you can figure it out," Kennedy said. "The purpose of that user agreement is to cover Facebook's rear-end. It's not to inform your users about their rights. Now, you know that and I know that. I am going to suggest to you that you go back home and you rewrite it and tell your $1,200-an hour lawyers, no disrespect, they're good, but tell them that you want it written in English and non-Swahili, so the average American can understand it. That would be a start."

 

The Louisiana Republican told Zuckerberg he can either spend millions of dollars to fight new legislation to regulate Facebook or help Congress solve the problem.

He said there are two problems with Facebook: privacy and propaganda.

Kennedy told Zuckerberg he was disappointed with the hearing because he felt like they were not connecting.




    "I think you are a really smart guy and I think that you have built an extraordinary American company and you've done a lot of good," Kennedy said. "Some of the things you've been able to do are magical, but our promised digital utopia, we have discovered, has minefields. There are some impurities in the Facebook punchbowl and they got to be fixed, and I think you can fix them."



 


In December 2015, The Guardian reported that United States politician Ted Cruz was using data from this breach and that the subjects of the data were unaware that companies were selling and politicians were buying their personal information. In March 2018, The New York Times, The Guardian and Channel 4 News made more detailed reports on the data breach with new information from former Cambridge Analytica employee turned whistleblower Christopher Wylie, who provided clearer information about the size of the data breach, the nature of the personal information stolen, and communication among Facebook, Cambridge Analytica, and political representatives who hired Cambridge Analytica to use the data to influence voter opinion.


"If there's an imminent threat of harm, we're going to take a conservative position on that and make sure that we flag that and understand that more broadly" Mark Zuckerberg




The breach was significant for inciting public discussion on ethical standards for social media companies, political consulting organizations, and politicians. Consumer advocates called for greater consumer protection in online media and right to privacy as well as curbs on misinformation and propaganda.





Mark Elliot Zuckerberg
Mark Elliot Zuckerberg is an American computer programmer and Internet entrepreneur. He is a co-founder of Facebook, and is currently its chairman and chief executive officer. His net worth is estimated to be US$62.2 billion as of March 25, 2018.



Zuckerberg launched Facebook from his Harvard University dormitory room on February 4, 2004 with college roommates and fellow Harvard students Eduardo Saverin, Andrew McCollum, Dustin Moskovitz, and Chris Hughes. The group then introduced Facebook to other college campuses. Facebook expanded rapidly, reaching one billion users by 2012. During this time, Zuckerberg became involved in various legal disputes brought by his friends and cofounders, who claimed they were due a share of the company based upon their involvement during its development phase.


Since 2010, Time magazine has named Zuckerberg among the 100 wealthiest and most influential people in the world as a part of its Person of the Year award. In December 2016, Zuckerberg was ranked 10th on Forbes list of The World's Most Powerful People.







ON THE CONGRESS


Sen. John Thune, a Republican from South Dakota, asked Mark Zuckerberg if he's willing to make a commitment to protect political speech from "all different corners."

Zuckerberg said he would.

"If there's an imminent threat of harm, we're going to take a conservative position on that and make sure that we flag that and understand that more broadly," he said.

Zuckerberg said he wants the


 "widest possible expression " on Facebook.





Facebook–Cambridge Analytica data scandal




 Aleksandr Kogan, a data scientist at Cambridge University, developed an app called thisisyourdigitallife. He provided the app to Cambridge Analytica. Cambridge Analytica in turn arranged an informed consent process for research in which several hundred thousand Facebook users would agree to complete a survey only for academic use. However, Facebook's design allowed this app to not only collect the personal information of people who agreed to take the survey, but also the personal information of all the people in those users' Facebook social network. In this way Cambridge Analytica acquired data for millions of Facebook users.



Characteristics of the data

The New York times reported that dataset included information on 50 million Facebook users. According to Facebook, up to 87 million users had their data shared, with 70.6 million of those people from the United States. Cambridge Analytica says it only collected 30 million Facebook user profiles.

Facebook sent a message to these users believed to be affected, saying the information likely included one's "public profile, page likes, birthday and current city". Some of the app's users gave the app permission to access their News Feed, timeline, and messages. The data was detailed enough for Cambridge Analytica to create psychographical profiles of the subjects of the data. The data also included the locations of each person. For a given political campaign, the data was detailed enough to create a profile which suggested what kind of advertisement would be most effective to persuade a particular person in a particular location for some political event.



The New York Times and The Guardian reported that as of March 17, 2018 the data was available on the open Internet and available in general circulation.


News coverage

In December 2015, The Guardian reported that Cambridge Analytica used the data at the behest of Ted Cruz.

On March 17, 2018, The New York Times and The Guardian each published articles stating that they collaborated with each other to investigate and report the breach and to share details. Both papers told the story of Christopher Wylie, a former employee of Cambridge Analytica turned whistleblower presenting information that The New York Times and The Guardian used as supporting evidence for various scandals which they described.


Use of the data

Various political organizations used information from the data breach to guide public opinion. Political events for which politicians paid Cambridge Analytica to use information from the data breach include the following:

    2015 campaign of United States politician Ted Cruz
    2016 Brexit vote



Responses



 Facebook director Mark Zuckerberg apologized for the situation with Cambridge Analytica, calling it an "issue," a "mistake" and a "breach of trust." Other Facebook officials argued against calling it a "data breach", arguing those who took the personality quiz originally consented to giving away their information. Zuckerberg pledged to make changes and reforms in Facebook policy to prevent similar breaches. On March 25, 2018, Zuckerberg published a personal letter in various paper newspapers apologizing on behalf of Facebook. In April they decided to implement the EU's General Data Protection Regulation in all areas of operation and not just the EU.

Amazon said that they suspended Cambridge Analytica from using their Amazon Web Services when they learned that their service was collecting personal information.

The government of India demanded that Cambridge Analytica report how anyone used data from the breach in Indian political campaigning.

The government of Brazil demanded that Cambridge Analytica report how anyone used data from the breach in Brazilian political campaigning.

Various regional governments in the United States have lawsuits in their court systems from citizens affected by the data breach.







SOURCE 
Mark_Zuckerberg, Facebook–Cambridge Analytica data scandal by WIKIPEDIA (CC BY CC)






"No Copyright Infringement Intended, Strictly For Promotional Purposes Only! All Rights Reserved To Their Respective Owners."


 "Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use."









0 comentarios :